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Podcast: Leadership & the Power of Self-Discipline with John Eades

podcast with john eades

Podcast: Leadership & the Power of Self-Discipline with John Eades

Greeting from John Wiesehan III:

Welcome to the Live Well. Be Well Podcast. Our goal is to address the trials and triumphs of daily life and always being better in all aspects of your life by looking forward to new challenges, but by being present today. We hope you get inspiration to live better, be better, and learn small habits that you can incorporate into your daily life to accomplish your goals. Let’s get started.

Wiesehan III:

Again, welcome. Thanks for joining us today. My name is John Wiesehan III, CEO of Direct CBD Online, host of the Live Well. Be Well. Podcast. I am honored to have my long-term, dear friend, John Eades here with me. John and I went to high school together. John is the CEO of LearnLoft, an organization whose mission is to turn professionals into leaders and create a healthier place to work.

We all try to strive to be better, and I think John brings that into the workplace as well as his personal life. He’s also the author of Building the Best: 8 Proven Leadership Principles to Elevate Others to Success and the host of Follow My Lead Podcast. So welcome, John.

John Eades:

I’m excited to be here.

Wiesehan III:

I wanted to have John on to talk about leadership and application of leadership in the workplace, people you surround yourself with, et cetera.

Before we kind of dig into the details, just give me a little bit, and our listeners a little bit, about your background and your “why.” I think your “why” and why you started your company is extremely important to understanding the mission of it.

More about how Eades started his company and career

Eades:

Yeah. I mean like anybody, you start to figure out what you’re going to do professionally based on what your family did, what you saw growing up, some combination of those things, and you create or find some interest for you.

I took a job with a company called Sales Performance International, a global sales training firm. I tell people all the time I never took my education very seriously in school. It was everything else other than education. But when I saw what really great professional education looked like my entire perspective changed. I now understood why so many people invested in their own development and not just relied on other people to do it for them, and it was just an eye-opening experience for me.

Now at the time, I didn’t like how SPI delivered its content. It was three- and four-day instructional and training sessions. I have a couple of kids. I just could never see them sitting in a room for four days as quickly as they navigate an iPhone.

So I wanted to pivot away from that business model and I created an online learning company. We were about a year into building that technology business and we were really struggling, and I did what most young leaders do. It couldn’t be my fault. It had to be somebody else’s, so I let go of one of my most important team members. At the end of that meeting, she looked at me and she said, “John, I didn’t know what we were doing, didn’t know where we were going, and I certainly didn’t know how I was helping us get there.”

If you’ve ever sat in a chair from a leadership perspective and realized that the problem is not your team, the problem is you, it is a humbling experience.

Wiesehan III:

Extremely.

Eades:

Extremely humbling. I’m a pretty emotional guy anyways, so she walked out of my office that night, and I cried like a baby, man. I really did.

Wiesehan III:

I mean it’s got to put you down, right? You’re like what am I doing? I’m in a leadership position and should I be? What am I doing?

Eades:

It was a tough spot, but in that moment… You asked about the passion, where it came from.

I just put my head in my hands and I said, “God, I don’t know why that just happened, but I’m going to do everything in my power to not let that happen to other people.”

I didn’t get into that business to get into the leadership development space, but it just happened naturally. So that’s-

Wiesehan III:

As most good things do, right?

Eades:

Yeah. No, it hasn’t been easy, like anything. I didn’t have the wherewithal or the knowledge to teach others at the time, so it’s been a long road in terms of credibility. But you asked where the passion and the mission that our work comes from. It’s from my own failure and trying to solve my own problem, and I think that’s where most great businesses come from.

The importance of investing in people

Wiesehan III:

I mean I look to you as a mentor in a business and personal sense too. In our one-on-ones you can really sense the passion of it’s not all about you, it’s not all about the money.

If you do things right and you treat the customer the right way and you treat your team the way they should be treated and elevate them to be successful everything else just happens. Everything else comes.

Right? And that’s been my biggest takeaway from spending a pretty decent amount of time with you over the last six to eight months, and I think it’s really important to get that message out there.

Eades:

And I’d even go a step further. Those important things that you just mentioned about being there for other people, helping elevate them, looking out for their best interest, not just your own, it doesn’t always show up on the balance sheet or at the monthly statement. Not at that moment, not right away, and it might never. It might never.

It might never impact your current business in the way that you want it to on your balance sheet, but here’s the thing. It’s the right thing to do.

Wiesehan III:

You’re investing in people. What better thing could you invest in?

Eades:

They’ll never forget it. They’ll never forget it. One of our coaching clients told me a story last week and I just loved it, because he hasn’t worked with someone in a few years and she came back to him just a week or two ago and said, “I felt compelled to reach out to you and say thank you for all that you’ve done for me. I’m now doing that for other people.”

That’s legacy. That’s impact well after you’re gone, and that is something that people can never take away from you.

Wiesehan III:

It’s one of the things that my wife says a lot in things that we can do to give back, “We are blessed to be a blessing.” And it’s the same thing, right? If you can create that type of environment with those people, I mean you’re doing a really, really good thing in the world.

Eades:

The thing I think about a lot in this too, wherever you’re listening today, it doesn’t come naturally for most people. If someone puts a group picture of you on Facebook or Instagram, I mean your eyes naturally go to, where am I and how do I look?

Wiesehan III:

100%.

Eades:

We’re wired to look out for us, number one, but the best leaders don’t do that. And the beautiful part about it, John, is that even the best leaders have learned and developed that skill, and that means everybody listening can do the same.

Are you going to go on to be the best leader of all time? That I don’t know. But I know we all can learn and grow into caring and elevating other people, and your life will be richer because of it.

How habits add up to make all the difference

Wiesehan III:

And you can always be better, right? I mean little steps compounded over time create the biggest difference. I say it every single interview and podcast we do and I think it’s so true, just those simple fundamental steps that you can make.

So, what are some of the positive habits you have developed to live well on a daily basis and then weekly basis? What do you do to make sure that you maintain your focus, your leadership, your drive, your passion — just little daily and weekly habits?

Eades:

I’d like to start with the definition of habits, okay?

Wiesehan III:

I like this. Okay.

Eades:

So, the definition of a habit is something that you do so often it becomes the very essence of your being, something you do so often it becomes the very essence of your being. A good example-

Wiesehan III:

A part of who you are?

Eades:

Yeah. You don’t even have to think about it. You don’t even have to… That’s something you do without thinking, because there’s a big difference in a behavior and a habit. A behavior is something that you do consciously. You have to decide to do it. A habit is something that you do unconsciously. You just do it without thinking.

If you plug your phone in next to your bed at night and you wake up in the morning, the first thing you’re going to do is what?

Wiesehan III:

Pick up your phone. Check your-

Eades:

That’s a habit. It’s a habit. You don’t even think about it. You just do it naturally. Behavior is much different. It’s something that you actually consciously think about.

So I want anybody thinking about their own behaviors and habits to think about what do I do consciously that I have to decide to do? For most people that might be going to the gym or doing your at-home workout. Like you don’t do that without thinking like, “I’d better do that.”

Wiesehan III:

Yeah. That’s so good, and I think it’s really important, especially in this time of quarantine. We’ll listen to this in a year and say, “Oh, my gosh, I forgot what quarantine was,” but I don’t think we’re ever going to forget what quarantine was.

Eades:

No, we’re not going to forget.

Wiesehan III:

But people can have such a unique opportunity right now to turn behaviors into habits, and I think that’s… Look, that can go the other way too.

Eades:

It can go good and bad.

Wiesehan III:

Right. So deciphering between the good and the bad and then turning positive behaviors into positive habits is good?

How to instill better habits in yourself starting today

Eades:

Absolutely. What’s the beautiful part is most research says that it takes anywhere between 21 and 66 days before a behavior becomes a habit.

So if you got your gym shoes out and your gym clothes out and you put it right next to your bed every single day, the first 21 days or so you’re going to have to consciously decide. By the time you get to 21 day or 66 days, but somewhere in that region, you’re going to love it. You’re going to do it without thinking.

So it is important to think… Because those things can be negative and positive. You could pick up the Nintendo game controller, Xbox or PS4 or whatever it is — you can do the same thing with that. You can open your phone, look at Instagram, look at Netflix, and all of a sudden, you’re 30 minutes later.

So you asked what some of those key habits are for me.

The most important one is what a good friend of mine calls “The 5:00 AM Club.” All The 5:00 AM Club says… It’s a great book. You should go check it out.

But the whole idea behind The 5:00 AM Club is that every day between 5:00 and 6:00 a.m. 20 minutes you spend in some kind of exercise, 20 minutes you spend in some kind of meditation or prayer, and then you then spend 20 minutes growing your mind, book, writing, reading, whatever those things are that you do.

If there’s anything that’s been one of the most pivotal things that I’ve committed to, particularly when it came to writing Building the Best, it’s getting up, being ready to go at 5:00 a.m., because then I have an hour and a half, two hours, before my kids ever get up where I can really dedicate time to myself.

Wiesehan III:

I agree with that and I think that is really important. My father-in-law always tells me, “Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.” I don’t know if you’ve ever heard of that, but it’s a great like old-time parable.

But to get up at 5:00 and be productive your entire day, you also have to change your behavior and your habits the night before, right? It just… It keeps going back, and, you know, not drinking too much, making sure you exercise to get a good night’s sleep, make sure you go to bed at a decent hour to get whatever your body particularly needs for rest. It’s all interconnected.

Self-discipline and forward-thinking

Eades:

I would go one other place. It’s because the only reason why anybody will do those things, it requires self-discipline.

Wiesehan III:

Yes.

Eades:

And there’s a definition of self-discipline that I just love. It’s the willingness and the ability to sacrifice what you want now for what you want more later on, the willingness and the ability to sacrifice what you want now for what you want later on.

Wiesehan III:

That’s good.

Eades:

The reason why it’s so good is because nobody will make the self-discipline choices unless they have hope in the future.

If they believe something good is going to happen to them in their future, or something that they’re working towards, or something that they want to go achieve or do, they’ll make a lot of self-discipline choices.

But the minute hope is lost, John, the minute we stop making self-discipline choices, and the habits get worse, the behaviors get worse, and all of a sudden we’re in a deep-

Wiesehan III:

It’s a compounding effect.

Eades:

Exactly.

Wiesehan III:

You’re in a deep, dark hole.

Eades:

So the reason why I bring that up is because it’s not as easy as just saying, “Let me snap on the will power.”

Wiesehan III:

It’s not easy. It’s easier for some than others, but in general, it’s a very difficult thing to do.

Eades:

It’s so hard.

Wiesehan III:

But you have to have a why, why do you do it?

Eades:

Yeah. There’s got to be a bigger thought or belief that you are good enough and that your best days are ahead of you. If anybody is listening to this right now and they’re struggling with that, know that you’re not alone. Everybody has been there in terms of not knowing the future. It’s the future for a reason, we don’t know it. But we have faith and belief that something good is in the future.

Having a deep purpose and “why” even through the hard times — it’s essential right now. So find people that you can get around you. If you don’t know what that is put yourselves in the position to figure that out.

A brief discussion about faith and the future

Wiesehan III:

That brings up a really good point. There is a… I don’t know if you ever… I know you’re a man of faith and your brother is priest, correct?

Eades:

That’s correct.

Wiesehan III:

A Catholic priest?

Eades:

Yeah.

Wiesehan III:

And we’ll get to that in a minute, but I want to talk about something real quick in what you said about looking forward, is there is a term that is used twice in the Bible called apokaradokía.

Eades:

I’m not familiar with it.

Wiesehan III:

Ever heard of it?

Eades:

No.

Wiesehan III:

I heard a sermon on this one time, and it struck me and it’s always been with me and I think about it all the time. Apo, A-P-O, means to turn from other interests with concentration. Kara, K-A-R-A, means head, and dokia means stretch it forward, not focused on what has been, but will be. Apokaradokía. It’s in the Letters from Paul to the Corinthians. It’s in those two books. It’s really cool.

It’s only mentioned twice, but apokaradokía, always stretching your head forward for what is to come and what will be, not what was in the past.

Eades:

That’s right. There’s a Latin phrase that I love called nunc incipere. What nunc incipere stands for is now I begin. I don’t really care where you’ve been in the past. I don’t care how yesterday went. We can’t change that anyways, but what we can care about is what we’re going to do moving forward.

So wrap up the concept of habits and everything we’re talking about, you’re not going to be perfect. You’re going to fail some days. You’re not going to have the habits that you know lead to success and you’re going to make some mistakes. Can we not let it happen two days in a row? Can we just do better today? If we’ve missed two days-

Wiesehan III:

One day at a time.

Eades:

That’s right.

Wiesehan III:

One day at a time.

Eades:

And it’s really hard to think that way, but it is the way the best think.

Wiesehan III:

Yeah. I was going to ask you what mantras or guiding principles and what motivates you, and I think that kind of wraps it all up, is now I begin. What are you going to begin today? What is something new that you can begin today that is small enough and that you can do every single day now for the next 60 days that will be… It will end up being so impactful in your lifelong term that it’s important enough for you to start now?

Eades:

Yeah. Every journey starts at the beginning, every journey.

Wiesehan III:

Yeah. It has to start somewhere.

Eades:

It doesn’t matter who you are, what you’re doing, it starts at the beginning. So I have… I’m just working on a new book and I started a collection of principles and things that I’ve learned, and I have pages of bullets.

So I don’t have… I mean I have so many things that I believe to be true today that are guiding principles to me, but probably my favorite is patience is a virtue. It’s a marathon and not a sprint, and can you have the fortitude and the perseverance to keep going when things get difficult because, again, your best days are ahead of you.

So patience is a virtue is a big one to me because not only have I experienced it in my own life, but I think we all want it right now. We want it… Like open TikTok and we share our first video and we expect it to go viral or something. Or we put out our first post on Instagram or LinkedIn or something and we just expect this big following to happen right away, and it’s just not how it happens.

Learning to be (and not to be) like your influencers

Wiesehan III:

It’s not. People say… In Direct CBD Online they’ll say, wow, you guys have got a ton of visitors. Well, guess what? When we started we had one, and a lot of times it was zero. It was like watching an EKG and it flatlined.

It was doing the same things every single day and the blog posts and the product descriptions and all those things consistently over a long period of time that have made huge impacts.

So I think this is going to be a really interesting answer, because I think it could go one of two ways. I can tell you what I’m thinking in your answer… but who is one person that has been consistently influential throughout your life? Who in your life, from start to finish, maybe not… Maybe it’s the last 15 years, but the most impactful and influential throughout your life and your guidance?

Eades:

Living human is my dad — good and bad. I mean real talk here. For many years I looked up to the man, and I’ve learned so much from him that’s important to me. He’s given me so many opportunities. He’s just one of those people that he walks in and you straighten up, and I enjoyed it. I liked it. I wanted to please him.

Later in life he’s made some choices to go in different ways that I have a hard time respecting. He left my mom after 41 years of marriage. Not that he’s a bad guy, not that I hate him. I’m a grown man with my own family. But there’s something very powerful about the relationship between a father and son when they’re in your life, good or bad.

So he’s easily the answer for me from start to finish, or start to the present moment. I still love him and we still talk, it’s just… It’s different. And when you have to look at your dad one day in one of the hardest conversations you’ve ever had say I just don’t respect you like I used to, it’s… I can’t imagine any dad likes to hear that.

Wiesehan III:

That’s got to be very humiliating.

Eades:

Yeah. I mean if you’re just thinking about wanting to be a good father for your kids… I mean I was riding in a car today with a guy that his dad left when he was nine years old. He grew up without a dad. He didn’t speak to him. He’s spoken to him a handful of times since he was nine years old.

And it’s like I got such a better childhood than that, I got such a better relationship with my dad than that.

So everybody is dealt different cards, but I think it’s a real challenge to me as a man to say, “How can I ensure that my son doesn’t look at me one day and say, ‘I just don’t respect you anymore?'”

Wiesehan III:

Yeah. It’s funny, because I don’t want to say that situation is necessarily similar, but my dad and I have gone through fairly significant ups and downs over the last really 10 to 15 years since I graduated college. I had an amazing childhood growing up. I mean he provided for me and my mom provided for me more than I could have ever imagined.

I want to give those things to my kids too, and I have a tremendous amount of respect for my father and what he’s taught me. I wouldn’t be here today if it weren’t for the things that I learned to do, but I think it’s also equally important on things to learn not to do, right? Like those can be equally valuable lessons. It’s what you take from learning on both sides of that coin that really forms who you can be today.

Eades:

And I’ll even go a step further. You’re not your dad and I’m not my dad. Everybody says you end up being like them.

Wiesehan III:

You’re still your own person, right?

Eades:

That’s right.

Wiesehan III:

You got to make your own decisions.

Eades:

And I think that’s an important aspect for anybody to learn in this experience. Everybody knows they are, but so often we forget. So it’s an incredible gift, good or bad if you decide to learn from it.

Wiesehan III:

That’s right.

Eades:

If you decide to learn from it. So I looked at… I’ve just gone into where I’m so committed to trying to learn from every single experience or opportunity that comes my way — whether that be in my personal life or in professional or business.

Everybody is experiencing some struggle or opportunity — or, however, you want to look at — through the coronavirus, and even if the business goes away tomorrow, which it very well could…

I mean this is an environment that we have never seen, but as long as you can learn from it and grow and get better and do things differently in the future, that’s how I like to look at things now.

Wiesehan III:

Yeah. You have to. There really isn’t a choice. It’s weird, we were talking earlier before you got on here about remote workplaces, and I think there are so many leaders in companies today that have been resistant to change of getting on an airplane and flying to a client meeting, but this has forced company leaders to do things digitally, where it may have been uncomfortable for them because they grew up in an era without a lot of abundant technology like we have now.

I think it’s going to change workplaces and environments. You know, just to change topics a little bit, I think the workplace in general and overall business travel will reduce significantly because of the productivity that we’re forced to experience now.

Eades:

100%, it’s going to. There’s no doubt about it.

Wiesehan III:

I’d like to understand… And if you don’t want to talk too much about it that’s totally fine, but I’d like to understand a little bit more about the influence your brother has in your life because I think that’s really interesting. I never had a friend with a brother who is a priest. I think it’s really, really cool. I grew up Catholic and I know you did too, but just what type of impact and role does he play in your life in general?

Eades:

He plays a tremendous impact in my life now.

Wiesehan III:

He’s younger?

Eades:

He’s older. He’s older. I’m 37 and he’s 39. He married us, baptized both my kids.

Wiesehan III:

That’s awesome.

Eades:

Yeah. We’re still very close. Any kind of philosophical questions… It’s funny, with all of this coronavirus stuff going on and they don’t have public masses, so he’s starting to do a lot of video stuff. So we’ve had quite a few calls each night, each week at night, just teaching him about video and how to use it and how does this look and how does this sound, just because we do so much of that in our work.

So it’s been fascinating to see him kind of now… I can pour back into him the way he’s poured into me from a faith perspective. The one thing I’ll say is when you see a man commit himself like he has to his faith walk and helping other people get to heaven, it is the most inspiring thing if you’re in tune with your faith that you can think of, because there is a tremendous-

Wiesehan III:

It’s a huge sacrifice.

Eades:

It is commitment to the Nth degree.

Wiesehan III:

It really is.

Eades:

We talk all the time in our keynotes and stuff about there’s a big difference in being interested and committed. If you’re interested in something, if it’s hot, if it sticks, if things go well, you keep going, or if things get hard you bounce, okay?

Wiesehan III:

That’s the truth.

Eades:

That’s just what it is. It’s dating. Commitment is much different. Commitment is I’m committed to doing this no matter the cost. I’m committed to you as a person or to this cause, and regardless of what happens I’m not letting go. And when you see a young man when he made that commitment and to his commitment now it is… It’s mesmerizing almost. Just thinking-

Wiesehan III:

It’s surreal.

Eades:

It is. John, it is surreal. Just thinking about your world right now, you think about money a lot. I’m talking about both of us, okay?

Wiesehan III:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Eades:

But you think about money and finances. You think about your health. You think about your marriage. You think about being a good father. You think about your relationships with your brothers and your dad. Like there’s a lot of stuff that you think about, and stuff that you care about a lot, a car you drive, where you live, like all this stuff.

He’s rejected all that. He’s rejected it.

Wiesehan III:

He’s like none of it really matters. It does, but…

Eades:

And it doesn’t mean you can’t desire or want to achieve things or provide. All that stuff is great. But when you start thinking about it in those terms you start thinking, man, here’s this guy that only gets one life on this Earth and that’s what he’s chosen.

Wiesehan III:

You don’t mesmerize when you think about it like that.

Eades:

Yeah. You don’t make choices like that, John, unless you believe something to your core. I don’t want to get in a philosophical discussion, but I heard this recently and I just loved it. Watergate… there were 12 or 14 guys involved in Watergate, and they all swore to each other that this would never get out, it would never get out. Five days later-

Wiesehan III:

It’s out.

Eades:

… the first guy cracked. A week later every single one of them cracked. So in the course of 10 days, this thing broke, and 14 guys said that they would never let it out. There were 12 disciples, 12, and if what happened with Jesus wasn’t true wouldn’t one of them cracked?

Wiesehan III:

Oh yeah.

Eades:

They would have cracked. And I only bring that up because it’s like-

Wiesehan III:

It’s a really good comparison.

Eades:

… that’s the kind of commitment that this man has made in his life, and it’s inspiring to me to be a better husband, a better father, a better teacher, those kinds of things, because if he can commit to that, I mean I can commit to the little stuff.

Wiesehan III:

To my kids. Yeah. Exactly. And my wife. Yeah. That’s awesome. Two questions just to close. Who is one person in your… And we ask everybody this, so this kind of… It’s really neat that we like to put as the closing questions. But who is one person in your life that you don’t give enough credit to for your success?

Eades:

Christina Wilder. Christina is my colleague. She’s been with me from the beginning and we’re completely different in almost every stretch of the imagination, but she’s helped push me in terms of the clarity of my communication. She’s helped push me on models that we teach. She’s not afraid to tell me something is not good.

So I just really commend her. She’s had a tough life herself with her dad and her journey, and she made a commitment five years ago to walk away from a really steady job and steady income to go with John Eades, to go do this thing that it was a bad idea at the time.

Wiesehan III:

That’s awesome.

Eades:

So I really respect her a lot for her taking risks. Everybody takes risks in different ways. Everybody has a different amount of risk that they’re willing to take or able to take, and she took it. It might not be to the scale of some people, but I know it was a lot for her, and I respect her a lot for that.

What it means to “stand outside the fire”

Wiesehan III:

That’s awesome. That’s awesome. It’s always… I think you can underestimate the influence certain people have in your life, and I think it’s always important to recognize them when you can.

What is your favorite song of all time that’s had the biggest impact on your life, because I believe music is a very emotional thing?

Eades:

That’s the easiest question you asked me all day.

Wiesehan III:

It’s the most fun too.

Eades:

Standing Outside the Fire by Garth Brooks.

Wiesehan III:

Oh, that’s a great song.

Eades:

I love the song for… I like make my kids listen to it all the time. It’s such a great story in it, because you can stand outside the fire in this life if you want to. You can hide. You can take the safe road. You can try to make every safe decision you can.

I was watching a movie last week called Greater. It’s about a guy from Arkansas, grew up with nothing, dad left when he was young, he was overweight. Like everything… They had no money, all the cards were stacked against him, but this kid had a dream to play college football at the University of Arkansas and he made great decisions his whole life.

He didn’t go to a small school where he had a scholarship and he didn’t have any money. He wanted to play football at Arkansas. He walked on year one, he worked out, changed his body, all this stuff. He ended up being a three-year starter, was an All-American in his senior year. Phenomenal story. He got drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the 1999 draft. 11 days later he was in a car wreck and died.

Wiesehan III:

What?

Eades:

Yep. And I tell that story about Burlsworth, that’s his last name, because it can be taken away so fast and-

Wiesehan III:

So fast. Plus be given to you so fast, but taken away so fast all at the same time.

Eades:

Yeah. I mean we’re just not guaranteed tomorrow. So even though you can go stand outside the fire and not be in the arena, as the famous line is, “The man in the arena, it’s not the life that you’ve been called to live.” I love seeing people in the fire, whether they get burned or not, man. Like I would prefer-

Wiesehan III:

At least they tried.

Eades:

I’d prefer you go down swinging than on the outside-

Wiesehan III:

Totally agree.

Eades:

… not taking your shot. There’s a quote that I just love, and I use it all the time. I use it in the book. Failure is not final, failure is feedback. So get inside the fire, go take your shot, chase the things that you want to achieve or do or the impact that you want to make in the world. Success is not guaranteed, only the struggle is.

Wiesehan III:

That’s so true. Failure is your first no, but it’s also your pathway to your yes.

Eades:

That’s right. I don’t tell anybody, “Shoot for failure!”

Wiesehan III:

But you got to try, or else you’re never going to know.

Eades:

You’re going to fail, and that’s okay. I tell people all the time it’s a worthwhile endeavor to stand inside the fire, and even if the outcome isn’t what you want, what you shoot for, good things will happen because of it.

Wiesehan III:

Yeah. And you have to believe in yourself, right? You have to have the confidence to stand up and do it, and I think that is-

Eades:

At least start.

Wiesehan III:

… 90% of the battle is making the decision to go with anything, with new behaviors and habits, whether you’re starting a business, starting a new relationship. Whatever you’re doing, the decision is 90% of it. People say… I’ve heard, “Oh, that was a great idea. I thought about that.” Right, but you didn’t do anything about it. Like that’s… 90% of the problem is people don’t execute.

Just make the decision to do what you believe in and believe in yourself and go and you’ll be amazed about what you can accomplish.

Eades:

Yeah. And don’t even go, like start even smaller than that. Just take one little step at a time. I know you never got an answer from that song, but I love the analogy and so, yeah, just take one little step, one little step forward towards what you’re trying to achieve, and over time it will add up.

Wiesehan III:

Yep. I love it. I want to just real quick… Shameless plug for you. Building the Best is an amazing book. We didn’t talk about it. We should do another podcast on it.

Eades:

We don’t need to. You’re good. You’re good.

Where you can further connect with John Eades

Wiesehan III:

So Building the Best, you can find it on Amazon, five-star rating, it’s awesome, anywhere you buy books. I mean you tell us. Where else can we find you?

Eades:

Yeah. Johneades.com, LearnLoft. LinkedIn is our best… That’s where we hang out the most and we put the most content out. I was driving over here today, it was kind of a cool moment, and we hit 100,000 followers on LinkedIn today.

Wiesehan III:

That’s huge. Congratulations.

Eades:

And what’s also cool about it, I don’t say that to impress you. I say it to impress upon you that we started that journey seven years ago and-

Wiesehan III:

But you had one at one point?

Eades:

Yeah, had one.

Wiesehan III:

It was probably you.

Eades:

It was maybe Christina. But it’s cool to see that kind of impact, and we have it in multiple places now, so our newsletter has 100,000 subscribers too. If you pour your passion and your heart into purposes that you care about you’ll get fulfillment out of what you’re doing, and I think that’s the lesson. So John Eades on LinkedIn. I’m trying to do more on Instagram, but those are the best places.

Wiesehan III:

Cool. Well thank you so much for coming on. It’s been an absolute pleasure, and I can’t wait till next time.

Eades:

It’s been my pleasure as well.

Wiesehan III:

Thank you for listening. You can keep up with episodes on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also visit directcbdonline.com, where you will find all podcasts under our resources section on the main menu bar. You can use coupon code LiveWellBeWell for 25% off of your first order, and remember to always live well and be well. We’ll see you next time.

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