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Podcast: COVID-19 Impacts – Nurse Practitioner Cynthia Thurlow

Podcast: COVID-19 Impacts – Nurse Practitioner Cynthia Thurlow

John:

Welcome to the Live well, Be well podcast. Our goal is to address the trials and triumphs of daily life and always being better in all aspects of your life by looking forward to new challenges, but by being present today. We hope you get inspiration to live better, be better, and learn small habits that you can incorporate into your daily life to accomplish your goals. Let’s get started.

Okay, thank you for joining us today. I have the distinct pleasure of bringing our first guest onto the Live well, Be well podcast. She’s a nurse practitioner, intermittent fasting expert, entrepreneur, functional nutritionist, and two-time TEDx speaker — Cynthia Thurlow. Thank you for joining us today.

Cynthia:

Thank you for having me.

Get to know the 2x TED Speaker and Nurse Practitioner

John:

We are thrilled for you to join us. And it’s an interesting time today — in life, in general — and what we’re dealing with as parents and entrepreneurs and bosses and everything in between. And I’d like to just kind of pick your brain with all of the expertise you have, everyone that you’ve spoken to over the last several weeks around COVID, in life, and what to do in the gaps of your daily life. But I’d like our listeners to really understand who you are first because I think that’s a really important component as we continue to talk to you and what your knowledge base really is.

So can you just talk a little bit about yourself, your experience, how you got to where you are today and why? Because I know the last year of your life was, I don’t know if rock bottom’s the right word, but you hit a really hard wall in your life and then you bounced back a hundred times more than where you were before. So if you could just give our listeners a little bit of context about how you got to where you are today.

Cynthia:

Yeah, so I’m trained as a nurse practitioner, but started as an ER nurse in Baltimore, and did that transition to becoming a nurse practitioner. So my first background was ER medicine, then cardiology as an NP for 16 years. And almost five years ago I left clinical medicine to start my role as an entrepreneur and not initially really knowing what direction things were going, and I had a really strong passion for the inherent value and impact of a whole food nutrition diet.

I feel that food can be as impactful as medication. So I had a lot of shifting opinions about how I wanted to interact with my patients. And so I built a practice and a business largely focused on starting with food. I always say, “All things start with food.

And so over the past four and a half years, I aligned with really focusing on female hormonal health, unknowingly kind of fell into that, fell into intermittent fasting, low carb lifestyle, carb cycling, as I mentioned hormones. So really focusing on the lifestyle piece that is really often neglected by traditional Western medicine practices. And I want to be very clear, I am a huge proponent of my Western medicine trained peers. I was one of them for many, many years. We wouldn’t be able to manage our current healthcare crisis and pandemic without them. So I want to be clear that I support them wholeheartedly. But I think there’s a different way to look at preventative and chronic disease management.

Being a public speaker after a life-threatening illness

Cynthia:

And so, a lot of the work that I do is turning the page on a lot of what we were trained in, a lot of dogma. From there I’m a believer in setting big, scary goals for yourself. A few years ago, I’ve always done a lot of public speaking, but I wanted to do a TED talk, and I ended up doing two.

My second one came after a 13-day hospitalization where I almost died. I became septic, had a ruptured appendix and a slew of complications after having been a very, very healthy person my entire life. And not only was that a physical transformation, but a spiritual and an emotional one.

And even though I had been in the hospital for two weeks and it took two weeks to get my brain wrapped around what had gone on, I was very committed to doing that second TED talk. And that second Ted talk on so many levels instilled in me and reaffirmed the emphasis on mindset is everything — that if you set your mind to something you are able to climb huge mountains and huge obstacles.

And I actually took my youngest with me, did that talk, and was still recuperating. And then 10 days after that had my appendix removed. So, my evolution over the last year has really pivoted off of almost dying. And then coming back and having my biggest business year I’ve ever had. So, what I always like to share with people is the power of mindset and real food nutrition and what my life looked like afterward was very different.

I had eaten a gluten, grains, and dairy-free diet for many years. I wasn’t able to eat much fiber, or much fruits or vegetables for a very long time. And I always say now I would describe my diet as carnivore-ish. Meaning I eat quite a bit of protein and that’s what actually agrees best with my body. But I do believe that it’s all about bio-individuality. You’ll see that term woven into a lot of the content that I create a lot of my blog posts and podcasts that I create.

So that’s kind of where I pivoted today. So I’m healthy and happy and live in the Washington DC suburbs with my husband, two boys, and my two doodles who usually are barking. They usually will make an appearance from an auditory perspective.

John:

We’re dog lovers. That’s OK.

Cynthia:

They are. They generally will make an appearance on some degree or another, some level or another, in almost all of my video content. So it becomes a running joke. People hear the doodles, they’re like, “Oh the doodles.” But they’re mischievous guys. So I am the queen of the castle.

John:

That is awesome. Thank you for sharing that. I think we are in front of one of the great minds of our time. I think you bring a lot of really cool content to the world. And two things that you really hit on that I’m very passionate about as well is mindset. You mentioned it and I think mindset is such a funny thing, right? If you set your mind to something and you can make small impactful changes consistently over time, they end up being huge things.

They may not seem like a lot today, but it’s the mindset of doing those small practices in your daily life to live well, be well, and just be better all the time. Right? And those things turn into big things over time. It’s not a “I’m going to wake up and change the world today.” It’s, “I’m going to wake up, do little things that could change the world over time.”

Right? Super important. I love that whole mindset mentality. And then bio-individuality. Did I say that right?

Cynthia:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

John:

So that’s a long word.

Cynthia:

Sometimes it’s a tongue twister.

Finding a healthier lifestyle that works for you

John:

Well, it’s really, it’s so true. What works for you may not work for somebody else. And I was introduced to you through a mutual friend who used to live in the DC area years ago. And my wife and I started intermittent fasting, which you spoke about on one of your TED Talks. And it’s changed my life. I mean, from no afternoon slump to feeling better to losing weight. But it was a small change. It seemed big in the beginning, but it was a small change that over time has created a lifestyle difference. And by the way we feel the way our bodies react to exercise, to certain things we eat.

Now, do we eat healthy every single meal? No, of course we don’t, but we say 90/10 when it comes to eating, right? Most people live by the 80/20 rule. By 90/10 it’s really important, right? You can do it 90% of the time you can make really big changes for yourself. So I love that. It’s awesome. And then we talk a lot about bio-individuality when it comes to CBD, right? Because CBD use, and we’ll get to your CBD use in a minute, but it works different for everyone. Some people have to take in the morning, some people have to take it at night. So it varies, right? It’s all about what works for you and for the person.

Cynthia:

I think that’s really critical for people to understand that because there’s no “one-size-fits-all” philosophy — as it pertains to lifestyle strategies — that it’s almost like you’re making a recipe. You have to decide what works best. Maybe when you make this recipe, maybe this time you use more paprika and next time you use less. It’s kind of figuring out like what dose, what product feels best and works best for me and my goals?

Same thing with nutrition. I always remind people we have gotten so disconnected from our bodies and so disconnected from the process of eating, we’re not even eating real food. We’re eating food-like substances. So, I always remind people that you have the ability to create your own science experiment every day. You can tinker and find, might be an N of 1, but that can be hugely impactful information about how to navigate your best life long-term.

John:

And it’s important that you can’t figure that out in a week. Right?

Cynthia:

Correct.

Positive habits you should incorporate today

John:

You have to dedicate the time to yourself to experiment long enough to figure out what works best for you. What are some of the positive habits that you have developed to live well every day?

Cynthia:

Yeah, I would say sleep is critical and I think we’re in a society that doesn’t value sleep. It’s like we work all day, we work all night. I get to bed before my 12-year-old. I mean, I’m in bed, so, high-quality sleep, getting off electronics, and actually sleeping well and restfully. I mean, waking up in the morning, you feel like a different person.

And our brains are actually more active at night than they are during the day. It is so critical that we have that reparative processes going on at night. So I would say sleep is number one. I would say number two, I have to give a nod to intermittent fasting, but our bodies are designed to eat less and fast longer. We have been conditioned by the processed food industry that we need to be snacking all day long and we need to have these highly addictive, highly excitotoxin foods in our diet.

Cynthia:

What I find is when people start fasting longer, they crave better foods. It may not be perfect, but they are craving better foods. They have less cravings, their digestion gets better. So I would say intermittent fasting and sleep. And then I would say the quality of the foods that we consume are absolutely critical. I have no problems sharing with your listeners that I’m 48 years old. I am oftentimes mistaken for someone that’s 10, 15 years younger than I am. And I don’t look like the average 48-year-old woman.

John:

No, you don’t.

Eating the rainbow and intermittent fasting

Cynthia:

Because I live a very different lifestyle and so I encourage people to eat as much nutrient-dense foods as their budget permits. So, when we’re talking about organic or wild-caught meat and fish and eating… I use the term, I know it’s kind of cliché, eat the rainbow. But, the brightly pigmented fruits and vegetables, there are actual chemicals in those foods that are designed to ensure your body is thriving. And then being smart about healthy fats. We demonized fats for a long time. I know that I contributed to that because that’s what I was schooled in in the 1990s.

But it’s really important that we’re getting in the right macronutrients, the right proteins, the right healthy fats, and carbohydrates, but not the processed ones. I’m not talking about [eating] donuts, I’m talking about squash and sweet potato and low-glycemic berries and really eating a nutrient-dense diet. And those three things alone, with the exception of the food piece, two of them cost nothing. Absolutely nothing. So those are the most impactful things that I think consistently that most people, if they at least attempt them, will find feel a whole lot better.

John:

Well no, when it comes to that, and I got a plug for intermittent fasting here too. I know that this is not the objective of our podcast, but our podcast is all about living well and being well, right? And I think that this is such a foundational change in the human psyche. Like you say, we are conditioned and trained to snack and eat and wake up, eat, you eat before you go to bed, all these things.

So, I fast generally until sometime, depending on my workout of the day, sometime between 11:30 and 12:00. What you break your fast with and what you give your body for the first time for the last 14, 16 hours is I think the most important component to how you feel the rest of the day.

So, if you break that with something that’s not nutrient-dense or something that your body doesn’t love and your body doesn’t turn into energy, you’re going to feel sluggish, you’re going to not feel great. And that’s what I’ve found is what you break your fast with is almost equally as important as the fast itself.

Cynthia:

I have to agree with you because sometimes people when they’re first fasting and they’re not fast-adapted, they’re so ravenously hungry, they’ll just grab whatever they put their hands on.

I still get messages on a daily basis from people and they’ll say, “Well, I grabbed a protein bar, I got a protein shake.” And I’m like, “I would rather you eat real food because that’s what your body actually needs.” I mean, I get it if you’re on the go when you don’t have another choice that’s better than nothing or just extend your fast longer.

For me personally, my ideal food to break my fast with is bacon and eggs and avocado. That is my happy place. And that I am so happy, [I feel] like bacon makes the world go round. It really does.

How CBD fits into Cynthia’s wellness routine

John:

What do you currently do to stay healthy relative to a CBD routine?

Cynthia:

Well, for me right now I enjoy CBD products at night. I don’t necessarily take them every day. But if I feel like I’ve had a night where I know I’m physically exhausted, maybe my brain is just still going. And that happens to all of us. I like it for sleep. I have a congenital hip issue, which has never required surgery, but I’m trying to ensure that doesn’t happen. But I’m a very active person, so if my hip is aching, sometimes I’ll take it for pain. And then occasionally, like this is a good example, right now it’s challenging being an entrepreneur and working from home with two children at home and two dogs and a spouse at home. And so some days if I’m feeling a little edgy, I might take some CBD to kind of chill me out and relax me a little bit.

So my N of 1 is that I use some type of CBD product almost every day, but for different reasons. It really depends on what I need. And for me, I know that even my own patients, when they’re working with me and I mean I talk about CBD with them with great frequency, one of the things I always say to them, “It’s an N of 1, but sometimes we have to try different things to find what works best.” So these are the things I recommend or the things that have worked best for me. And so I’m constantly learning to try to make sure that there’s not some new use for CBD that I’m unaware of.

I mean, even the hemp sanitizing spray, I was so excited to find a sanitizing product because you can’t find them in the stores. I put it all over social media. I was like, “Hey, I just bought a couple bottles. Get yourself some bottles. At least you can get your hands clean.”

John:

Yeah, it’s funny, I had some friends call me last night and they said, “Hey, we just can’t find toilet paper anywhere and hand sanitizer, I’m going out and buying a little two-ounce pumps spray at the gas station.” Well, we are selling a lot of hemp hand sanitizer and I’m glad we’re able to provide it for people. And it’s just one of those things. You just… Oh, there’s the doodles.

Cynthia:

[crosstalk 00:16:09] There’s always someone barking.

Advice for those beginning or modifying a wellness routine

John:

No, I mean, you made a really good point. During these uncertain times and health is always, not always, but overall health right now is at the top of everyone’s minds. What kind of advice would you give someone today who wants to start their better wellness or health wellness journey now that they may have some time to dedicate to it? Where do you start?

Cynthia:

Oh, I always start with sleep. So sleep first. Make sure you’re getting seven, eight hours a night of sleep. I would say that that’s a good first step. And then once you’ve mastered getting really solid sleep, or sleep without setting an alarm. Very rarely in the last few weeks have I had to set an alarm for myself, only when I have early business calls. I’m just letting myself sleep, and some days I sleep in till 8:00 or 9:00 and that’s almost unheard of. My kids were like, “I can’t believe mom is sleeping until 9:00 in the morning.” I’m like, “Well, some days I need that.”

I would say that it’s also really critical that you’re doing some stress reduction modalities and it doesn’t have to be twisting yourself up into a pretzel and doing yoga, but it could be getting outside in nature, going for a walk, having a connection with spirit.

I know for us our church is doing Facebook Lives. They’re doing mass through Facebook Live so people can still connect. This is obviously a very spiritual time in the Christian calendar.

I think it’s important to do something that you love. It could be reading a good book or listening to a good podcast or connecting with a loved one. I mean, even though we can’t all be together, we can FaceTime. I mean, I’ve gotten really savvy with grandparents getting on FaceTime with their grandkids. You don’t even have to be involved. My kids are old enough now that I’m like, “Go call your grandmother.”

Further ways to feed your family’s minds, bodies, and spirits

John:

It’s so true.

Cynthia:

Yeah, “Go call your grandmother.” So yeah, technology allows us to be connected. But I think you have to nourish your brain. You’ve got to nourish your body and making sure that you’re making as good of choices as you can. I just find sometimes it’s easier to have fun foods around but not let it be a focus. And by fun foods, I’m the only female in a house of all men. Chips are a big deal, so I always find the healthiest chips. I’m always working within the context of what is good, better, best. So what is the best option given what I have? And so, it could be a plantain chip that has three ingredients or it could be Jackson’s Honest — coconut oil chips that are three ingredients.

Cynthia:

So my kids know they’re going to have something fun, but it’s going to be a healthier version, or getting your kids in the kitchen. So I think there’s lots of ways to stay healthy, but it usually centers around sleeping, stress reduction, good food choices are always a good… and moving your body. It doesn’t have to be complicated. Do something every day.

John:

Yeah. And simply put, it sounds to me you could sum all that up and do something to feed your mind, your body and your spirit. Right?

You do those three things, something every day, then you can gradually move to bigger goals and things like that. I always tell people, “I truly believe that you are the sum of the five most people you spend your time with.” And I think it’s really important for one of those beings to be something spiritual because that just feeds your soul on where you’re at.

And then those other four people that are around you, and I kind of count your family is one, because you’re kind of one body, and then those other three you get to choose, right? So in my mind, I don’t choose the spirit part. I don’t choose my family. I think those were given to us. And then everything else you get to play a part in who feeds your brain. And I think that’s really important, especially in this time. Who are you going to FaceTime? Who are you going to text? You get to choose how those other people influence your decision-making.

Cynthia:

And I think it’s really important, I think as a parent, my children look to me to be an example, my husband as well. And so I’ll give you, this is kind of funny, I’ve done really well through this whole social isolation, not being able to get out and go to the gym. Everyone’s constrained right now. And I had a day last week, so my kids know my routine is I do this and this and this, and then the afternoon mom leaves to take the dogs for a walk. Well, it started to rain and you would’ve thought the world had come to an end. I mean, I got outside, I had tears in my eyes, I was really frustrated, and I took the dogs for a walk long enough to let them go to the bathroom, brought them back inside and my husband just took one look at me and I was like, “I can’t talk right now.”

I was like, “This is a first world problem. We got shelter, we’ve got food, I’m safe.” I’m like, “I’m just frustrated.” And so I just had to kind of work through it. And I think part of this is acknowledging we are always an example to our loved ones. So how we choose to respond when things don’t go the way that we want to is really important. And I actually openly talked to my kids and said, “I want you to understand, that hour for me is so, so important for my mental wellbeing because I’m out in nature. I have my sunglasses off, so I’m getting lots of good vitamin D synthesis and exposure and it’s good exercise for me and the dogs. But it’s the only time during the day I don’t talk.”

John:

It’s important.

Cynthia:

So I was like, “Mom is tired of talking by the end of the day, like really, really like need a break.” And so we kind of laughed about it. But don’t let one thing not going the way you want it to ruin your day. That’s just what it reinforced for me. I was like, my kids are looking at me to be the example for them. This is hard on them. I have competitive athlete children. To not be in the pool, to not be playing football, to not be doing CrossFit, they’re used to moving their bodies. I would say that my kids are very fit. And so for the last month everything’s been kind of hung up.

And we made the investment, I was watching and I felt very strongly — like eventually we’re not going to be able to go to the gym. And so, we created a home gym. We’ve got TRX bands and kettlebells and weights and plates and all these other things. And I said, that was one of the best decisions I ever made. I was just brilliant. But now we can all work out at home, either together or independently, we can all do that. So, getting that physical activity in is important for mindset as well.

John:

Critical. I mean, for me, like you walking your dogs for the hour, I have to exercise and I think you do too.

Cynthia:

I do that too.

John:

Yeah, you have to. But I can exercise and everything else can be fine. My wife needs her alone space. So the kids are in my office conference room right now on their iPads with their friends and I’m in here talking to you. My wife is at home doing whatever she’s doing. And the world will be happy when we come back home, right? Not that that’s not beforehand, but it just makes everybody a little bit better. No, so it’s great.

Cynthia’s expertise on COVID

John:

So I’d like to turn to COVID. I’d like to talk about this coronavirus. Everybody knows it’s here. I don’t want to focus too much on it, but I know you have interviewed a lot of doctors and MDs or whoever you’ve talked to. I don’t know specifically who they are. But I’d like you to just talk about what you think the overall tone of the conversations you’ve had with your colleagues. Are they optimistic, are they stressed, is the focus in the right spot? Are there any misconceptions? Just give us generally what you have gathered through all of your interviews you’ve done over the last three weeks.

Cynthia:

Well, I would say it’s probably all of the above. I think they’re frustrated. I think they are frightened. I think they’re concerned. I think they’re overwhelmed. I think they’re exhausted. And I used to be a frontline person. I was an ER nurse, I was an NP working in cardiology. So I took care of patients in the ICU and the ER and high acuity areas. And what I can say is without a doubt we were not prepared. We were not prepared for this pandemic. I want to take politics completely out of what I’m saying. We were not prepared as a nation. Because we were not prepared it means our frontline healthcare providers are really bearing the brunt of what is going on and by that I mean, they’re not protected sufficiently. And I think that’s incredibly, profoundly upsetting for me.

It’s actually something I get very kind of… and I’m not a particularly emotional person. It’s something that makes me very emotional because there are people on the front line that are dying and are getting sick because they’re not protected. What I can say is that the impact of social distancing cannot be underestimated, how critically important it is for us as individuals to recognize that we have to think as a community and less about ourselves. If we can laugh on this podcast about, “Oh, I’m bummed because I can’t go to the gym,” or you’re bummed because you can’t get out of the house.

But the real impact of us staying home is protecting not only those that are immunocompromised in our respective areas but also protecting those healthcare providers. So I would say we’re all in this for the long haul. I think that it’s going to take longer to get out of this than we suspect it will.

I am definitely in touch with friends of mine who are at big academic centers, so I feel very confident with the information that I have at this point in time. It is so, so critical, if I can emphasize nothing else, to stay home. I know a lot of people say that, but there’s a reason why there are some cities that are exponentially growing in terms of cases, largely because people did not heed that information. If we stay at home and we wear masks, if we have to go to the grocery store or if we have to go to a doctor’s appointment, we are less likely to shed the virus and expose other people to it. So I would say that we are hopeful. We obviously will come out on the other side. I don’t think we’ve seen the whole net impact yet of what’s going to transpire.

I’ve been asked repeatedly how long do I think it will be before we have the new normal? I honestly think the new normal is going to be 18 months away, that we haven’t fully recognized how much this is going to impact us. And I don’t think the economy is going to implode. I don’t think that everyone needs to be paranoid.

But I do think we have to be cautiously optimistic that our healthcare providers are going to be able to have access to the protective equipment they need and have access to medication to treat patients. I think what I find most concerning is that initially, at least, my perspective from what I was hearing from overseas friends — my friends that are in Italy, I have friends that are in Asia — so I’ve definitely been watching this evolve, is the value of taking care of yourself cannot be underestimated.

Unequivocally, the people that are not doing well or dying almost all of them, by this I mean patients, not healthcare providers, are people that have at least one co-morbidity. And what does that mean? They’re obese. They’re prediabetic or diabetic. They’re hypertensive. They’ve got ongoing chronic health problems. They are much more susceptible to suffering the profound impact that COVID can have. And we still don’t fully understand why even some healthy people can get very sick. Yeah, there’s something called cytokine storm and that’s when this inflammation process in the body just goes exponentially wrong and you end up with these significant lung issues and you’re on a ventilator, which is a breathing machine, and not everyone recovers. So I would say that the healthcare providers I talk to are in a position right now where they’re very concerned and they’re hoping that the public will do what’s necessary to stop the spread.

I mean, I’m obviously in a major U.S. city. Washington DC is not as impacted as a lot of other cities like New York and Detroit and New Orleans. But we don’t know. I mean we don’t know if this is going to follow the same path as flu. People keep asking me that too. “Is this going to follow the same path as flu, that usually by April, flu cases die down and then they pick back up again in the fall?” We don’t know. It’s a novel virus. It’s not a brand new virus but this variant of the virus is new and so we just don’t fully know.

John:

Yeah. And then, I don’t know, you learn something new every day, right? When it really hit me was last week. It really started to bother me when we started looking at a death toll like a stock ticker and it’s really sad. I mean these are people’s lives, these are people’s loved ones and their parents and their children and it’s just — enough’s enough. I watch it for a little bit in the morning, over half a cup of coffee and a little bit at night. And outside of that, I wait for the breaking newsletters to come through on my phone that they’ve found a vaccine or something, hopefully soon.

Cynthia:

Right, right. I actually don’t watch the news.

John:

Good for you.

Cynthia:

I trend what’s on Twitter and I listened to the reports that my colleagues put out, which are objective and science-based. I mean, there was someone who wanted to argue with me on Twitter this morning and I finally just said… He was assuming that everything that this ER physician was sharing was biased. And I said, “What does he have to be biased about?” He was showing how the rates of deaths were doubling. And that’s the context of the information he shared, which I then retweeted. And I said, “He has no agenda. He just wants people to be educated.” When you’re looking objectively at data, it’s like, okay, where did the data come from and who’s benefiting? If it’s factual information, like this is the death rate, this is where it was the day before, this is how it’s doubled, this is where it is now. I said, “That’s an education. He just wants people to be aware.” It’s not slowing. So let’s look at it from that context.

Who’s helped Cynthia get where she is today

John:

Yeah. Flatten the curve. Do what we can to flatten the curve. So, okay, in closing here, and thank you so much for being on, it was truly an honor to have you as our first guest on the Live well, Be well podcast. What is one person in your life you don’t give enough credit to for your success?

Cynthia:

That’s a good question. I probably would have to say, first and foremost, I mean obviously a lot of the success I have is my own drive. But my team, I probably don’t thank them enough because they are behind the scenes making everything look easy. Someone said to me the other day, “You seem like you’re everywhere.” I’m like, “Oh no. I’m not.” So I would say my team is hugely instrumental in the success I’ve had because they’ve been able to create the content, disseminate it, make it appear that I’m everywhere, when in essence I’m not. And then obviously my family, without question.

John:

And that is what makes you a great leader as well because you understand the value-

Cynthia:

Thank you.

John:

… of an amazing team around you. And then last question, and this is more just because I’m a music lover, I love music. What is your favorite song of all time that has had the biggest impact on your life? Because I believe that music is an emotional connection and it’s an interesting question when you think about it. So I’m curious.

Cynthia:

Well, you’ll appreciate this. I was hired by a company last year to be a spokesperson for a product. And at the first event, the sound guy said, “What song do you want to play when you walk across the stage?” And as a joke I said, “Metallica’s Enter Sandman,” because it’s a song that when I hear it, it gets me really pumped up. I like to listen to in the gym. And he said, “Oh no, no, no, they’re very conservative. We probably should pay like a Taylor, like a…” I said, “Fine, whatever you want is fine.” So I’m getting up on stage and what does he play? Enter Sandman, just the riff, the beginning of the song. And so think for me it represents a lot of things. It’s seemingly out of character. People would assume I wouldn’t even know what Metallica is, let alone that I listen to it, but a lot of the music I listened to in the gym is like the stuff that gets me pumped up.

But it’s indicative of people expect one thing and I think I show them something else. I think they assume I’m going to be vapid and superficial and then they realize I’m not. So for me a song like that represents so many things, largely the fact that don’t judge a book by its cover and that there’s always something unique and special about the business people that you interact with, things you don’t know about them. Yeah. For me, I grew up in New Jersey in the 1980s and 1990s and so for me like good, loud music in my ears will get me completely pumped up and in a good way.

Where you can connect more with Cynthia Thurlow

John:

That’s great. That’s great. Well thank you for being with us. Where can people find you?

Cynthia:

Yeah, so www.cynthiathurlow.com. I’m active on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. On Facebook I actually have a free Facebook group called Intermittent Fasting Lifestyle\Cynthia Thurlow, where we produce a lot of content and it’s a great place to connect.

John:

And listeners, all of those resources, all of those links will be on Direct CBD Online under the resources section Live well. Be well podcast. We will have a full transcript of this audio along with all the links that Cynthia has mentioned here as well. So, thank you so much for joining us. We will see you next time.

Cynthia:

Thank you.

John:

Thank you for listening. You can keep up with episodes on iTunes, Google podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also visit directcbdonline.com and you will find all podcasts under our resources section on the main menu bar. You can use coupon code Live well. Be well for 25% off of your first order and remember to always live well and be well. We’ll see you next time.

 

More from Cynthia Thurlow

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